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The travel ABCs of Samoa: W is for waterfalls

Welcome back to the wanderlust-inducing travel ABCs of Samoa series! My, how far we have come - we've nearly completed our alphabet journey. Today, let's look at wondrous 'W'.

We have wandered through museums and wheedled our way through fun markets, but now it is time to dip our feet into the wonderful waterfalls of Samoa.

W is for...

Waterfalls

Afu Aau Waterfall, also knows as the Olemoe Falls, graces the south-eastern landscape of Savai'i, and is voted as the number one waterfall to see in Samoa by TripAdvisor reviewers. One reviewer called it a "slice of heaven" while another had high praise for the "breathtaking, powerful waterfall and fresh water pool" alongside the cascading waterfall. It probably helps, too, that this picturesque waterfall and swimming hole is surrounded by emerald green rainforests - the ultimate tropical Pacific island getaway.

Papasee'a Sliding Rock received the runner up ranking, thanks to the fun natural waterslide formed by its slippery rocks, while Papapapaitai Falls in Apia came in a reputable third place. Samoa Travel notes that the magnificent Papapapaitai Falls are some of the highest in the country, falling into the depths of a gorge. The best place to see this beauty is a vantage point off the Cross Island Road, so be sure to take your camera on the drive!

Upolu also has its fair share of mesmerising waterfalls. Both the Togitogiga Waterfall and Sopoaga Falls can be found here. Togitogiga Waterfall is an ideal picnic spot, and also has changing rooms conveniently built near the waterfall and its swimming hole. Samoa Travel notes that the great Samoan warriors of the past once swam here. This swimming spot can be found in the village of Saleilua, not far from the Le Pupu Pue National Park.

Sopoaga Falls are located in south-eastern Upolu, near the Lotofaga village. The waterfall looks like a lace curtain, jetting down in a ribbon-straight line. Sopoaga Falls are framed by gardens with unique, exotic Samoan flowers, which have been signposted for the curious traveller.